Sunday, May 25, 2008

Tall men and smaller ones in traffic on race day

A few observations while waiting for the Coca-Cola 600 to begin:

Yao Ming is a very tall man. I know that's not exactly breaking news, but until you see a man who really is 7 feet, 6 inches tall or whatever size the Houston Rockets star is, it's hard to completely grasp the concept. Ming, at the track as part of Coca-Cola promotion for this summer's Olympics, was walking through the garage and his head, shoulders and pretty much entire upper torso towered above those around him. He could not have got lost if he tried.

If you're one of those drivers who pulls up to the front of a long line of traffic and then forces your way in rather than waiting your turn, that doesn't mean you're smarter than the rest of us. It just means that we were raised better than you were.

So I'm watching the driver introductions to the Indianapolis 500 on TV and Marco Andretti is wearing a Fedora and a jacket with a wide belt. His car is sponsored by the "Indiana Jones" movie and the get-up is supposed to make him look like Harrison Ford does in the films. Actually, it makes him look like he bought a Halloween costume at Wal-Mart.

I got up in time Sunday morning to watch the final two-thirds of the Monaco Grand Prix. You don't have to be a big Formula One fan to be impressed by seeing those cars zip around that street course. Lewis Hamilton was way out in front, but they showed in-car shots of him darting up hill, downhill, through underpasses and around hairpins and it felt like you were on a roller coaster at your local theme park.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great Job Mr. Poole, you did the Trifecta Sunday, watching all three races.

That's why you're the man. So many NASCAR writers don't pay any attention to other forms of motorsport, and you can tell when they try to comment on it.

Monkeesfan said...

I missed Monte Carlo (wouldn't have watched it anyway as I hate F1) but caught both the 500 and 600. Some observations -

** Danica Patrick continues to prove herself a total fraud. This is the fifth time in the last eight to ten IRL races she has crashed in or exiting the pits, and she spent the day before that whining "I can't drive the car, I can't pass anyone" and not offering any kind of answers to her team to try and solve the problems. Notice that her teammates all were able to give feedback that their crews could use to improve their cars; Patrick alone in AGR never has answers. But because she is a woman she gets the ride and will not come under the kind of fire from the press Paul Dana got after he got killed.

** Tomas Scheckter deserves better than this. He is the most exciting racer in IRL yet his strong efforts don't get better finishes.

** It is always good seeing A.J. Foyt's #14 running in the top five and finishing in the top ten.

** It is also good seeing Panther Racing running strong.

** At least Chip Ganassi can be proud of his IRL team.

** Brian Vickers has found something in how to drive the 600; this is the second year in a row he was strong in this race.

** This 600 was less a race of suspense than one of surprises. Kyle Busch's electrical problems (how is it that alternators seem to constantly break down here?), Tony Stewart's flat tire, Kurt Busch's wreck, all were surprises.

** The Juan Montoya deal has several people at fault, and curiously no one seems to have noticed that when drivers are going through crew chiefs with this kind of frequency it points to that the driver doesn't know what he wants to make the car go fast anymore. It may not be entirely Montoya's fault here, but one has to question whether he knows how to make the car better anymore.


Well, now it's on to Dover.

Richard in N.C. said...

DAVID- Let that be a lesson. You are not overweight, just under-height. A fan.

That Girl said...

agreed!

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